Act IV, Scene 5 Another part of the field.

Enter Constable, ORLEANS, BOURBON, DAUPHIN, and RAMBURES

 

Constable O diable!
ORLEANS O seigneur! le jour est perdu, tout est perdu!
DAUPHIN Mort de ma vie! all is confounded, all!
Reproach and everlasting shame
Sits mocking in our plumes. O merchante fortune!
Do not run away.
  [A short alarum]
Constable Why, all our ranks are broke.
DAUPHIN O perdurable shame! let's stab ourselves.
Be these the wretches that we play'd at dice for?
ORLEANS Is this the king we sent to for his ransom?
BOURBON Shame and eternal shame, nothing but shame!
Let us die in honour: once more back again;
And he that will not follow Bourbon now,
Let him go hence, and with his cap in hand,
Like a base pander, hold the chamber-door
Whilst by a slave, no gentler than my dog,
His fairest daughter is contaminated.
Constable Disorder, that hath spoil'd us, friend us now!
Let us on heaps go offer up our lives.
ORLEANS We are enow yet living in the field
To smother up the English in our throngs,
If any order might be thought upon.
BOURBON The devil take order now! I'll to the throng:
Let life be short; else shame will be too long.
  [Exeunt]

 

Act IV, Scene 6 Another part of the field.

Alarums. Enter KING HENRY and forces, EXETER, and others

 

KING HENRY V Well have we done, thrice valiant countrymen:
But all's not done; yet keep the French the field.
EXETER The Duke of York commends him to your majesty.
KING HENRY V Lives he, good uncle? thrice within this hour
I saw him down; thrice up again and fighting;
From helmet to the spur all blood he was.
EXETER In which array, brave soldier, doth he lie,
Larding the plain; and by his bloody side,
Yoke-fellow to his honour-owing wounds,
The noble Earl of Suffolk also lies.
Suffolk first died: and York, all haggled over,
Comes to him, where in gore he lay insteep'd,
And takes him by the beard; kisses the gashes
That bloodily did spawn upon his face;
And cries aloud 'Tarry, dear cousin Suffolk!
My soul shall thine keep company to heaven;
Tarry, sweet soul, for mine, then fly abreast,
As in this glorious and well-foughten field
We kept together in our chivalry!'
Upon these words I came and cheer'd him up:
He smiled me in the face, raught me his hand,
And, with a feeble gripe, says 'Dear my lord,
Commend my service to me sovereign.'
So did he turn and over Suffolk's neck
He threw his wounded arm and kiss'd his lips;
And so espoused to death, with blood he seal'd
A testament of noble-ending love.
The pretty and sweet manner of it forced
Those waters from me which I would have stopp'd;
But I had not so much of man in me,
And all my mother came into mine eyes
And gave me up to tears.
KING HENRY V I blame you not;
For, hearing this, I must perforce compound
With mistful eyes, or they will issue too.
  [Alarum]
  But, hark! what new alarum is this same?
The French have reinforced their scatter'd men:
Then every soldier kill his prisoners:
Give the word through.
  [Exeunt]

 

To view other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act III, Scene 7 The French camp, near Agincourt:
Act I, Scene 1 London. An ante-chamber in the KING'S palace. Act IV, Prologue
Act I, Scene 2 The same. The Presence chamber. Act IV, Scene 1 The English camp at Agincourt.
Act II, Scene 1 London. A street. Act IV, Scene 2 The French camp.
Act II, Scene 2 Southampton. A council-chamber. Act IV, Scene 3 The English camp.
Act II, Scene 3 London. Before a tavern. Act IV, Scene 4 The field of battle.
Act II, Scene 4 France. The King's palace. Act IV, Scene 5 Another part of the field./Act IV, Scene 6 Another part of the field.
Act III, Scene 1 France. Before Harfleur. Act IV, Scene 7 Another part of the field.
Act III, Scene 2 The same./ Act III, Scene 3 The same. Before the gates. Act IV, Scene 8 Before KING HENRY'S pavilion.
Act III, Scene 4 The FRENCH KING's palace. Act V, Scene 1 France. The English camp.
Act III, Scene 5 The same. Act V, Scene 2 France. A royal palace.
Act III, Scene 6 The English camp in Picardy.  

 

To view other Henry V sections:

Main Play Page      Play Text    Scene by Scene Synopsis     Character Directory     Commentary  

 

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All's Well the Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Cardenio Comedy of Errors Coriolanus
Cymbeline Edward III Hamlet Henry IV, Part 1 Henry IV, Part 2 Henry V
Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John
King Lear Love's Labours Lost Love's Labours Wonne Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice
The Merry Wives of Windsor A Mid Summer Night's Dream  Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II
Richard III Romeo & Juliet Sir Thomas More Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsman The Winter's Tale

 

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