Act IV, Scene 2 A plain in Warwickshire.

Enter WARWICK and OXFORD, with French soldiers

 

WARWICK Trust me, my lord, all hitherto goes well;
The common people by numbers swarm to us.
  [Enter CLARENCE and SOMERSET]
  But see where Somerset and Clarence come!
Speak suddenly, my lords, are we all friends?
CLARENCE Fear not that, my lord.
WARWICK Then, gentle Clarence, welcome unto Warwick;
And welcome, Somerset: I hold it cowardice
To rest mistrustful where a noble heart
Hath pawn'd an open hand in sign of love;
Else might I think that Clarence, Edward's brother,
Were but a feigned friend to our proceedings:
But welcome, sweet Clarence; my daughter shall be thine.
And now what rests but, in night's coverture,
Thy brother being carelessly encamp'd,
His soldiers lurking in the towns about,
And but attended by a simple guard,
We may surprise and take him at our pleasure?
Our scouts have found the adventure very easy:
That as Ulysses and stout Diomede
With sleight and manhood stole to Rhesus' tents,
And brought from thence the Thracian fatal steeds,
So we, well cover'd with the night's black mantle,
At unawares may beat down Edward's guard
And seize himself; I say not, slaughter him,
For I intend but only to surprise him.
You that will follow me to this attempt,
Applaud the name of Henry with your leader.
  [They all cry, 'Henry!']
  Why, then, let's on our way in silent sort:
For Warwick and his friends, God and Saint George!
  [Exeunt]

 

Act IV, Scene 3 Edward's camp, near Warwick.

Enter three Watchmen, to guard KING EDWARD IV's tent

 

First Watchman Come on, my masters, each man take his stand:
The king by this is set him down to sleep.
Second Watchman What, will he not to bed?
First Watchman Why, no; for he hath made a solemn vow
Never to lie and take his natural rest
Till Warwick or himself be quite suppress'd.
Second Watchman To-morrow then belike shall be the day,
If Warwick be so near as men report.
Third Watchman But say, I pray, what nobleman is that
That with the king here resteth in his tent?
First Watchman 'Tis the Lord Hastings, the king's chiefest friend.
Third Watchman O, is it so? But why commands the king
That his chief followers lodge in towns about him,
While he himself keeps in the cold field?
Second Watchman 'Tis the more honour, because more dangerous.
Third Watchman Ay, but give me worship and quietness;
I like it better than a dangerous honour.
If Warwick knew in what estate he stands,
'Tis to be doubted he would waken him.
First Watchman Unless our halberds did shut up his passage.
Second Watchman Ay, wherefore else guard we his royal tent,
But to defend his person from night-foes?
  [Enter WARWICK, CLARENCE, OXFORD, SOMERSET, and
French soldiers, silent all]
WARWICK This is his tent; and see where stand his guard.
Courage, my masters! honour now or never!
But follow me, and Edward shall be ours.
First Watchman Who goes there?
Second Watchman Stay, or thou diest!
  [WARWICK and the rest cry all, 'Warwick! Warwick!'
and set upon the Guard, who fly, crying, 'Arm!
arm!' WARWICK and the rest following them]
  [The drum playing and trumpet sounding, reenter
WARWICK, SOMERSET, and the rest, bringing KING
EDWARD IV out in his gown, sitting in a chair.
RICHARD and HASTINGS fly over the stage]
SOMERSET What are they that fly there?
WARWICK Richard and Hastings: let them go; here is The duke.
KING EDWARD IV The duke! Why, Warwick, when we parted,
Thou call'dst me king.
WARWICK Ay, but the case is alter'd:
When you disgraced me in my embassade,
Then I degraded you from being king,
And come now to create you Duke of York.
Alas! how should you govern any kingdom,
That know not how to use ambassadors,
Nor how to be contented with one wife,
Nor how to use your brothers brotherly,
Nor how to study for the people's welfare,
Nor how to shroud yourself from enemies?
KING EDWARD IV Yea, brother of Clarence, are thou here too?
Nay, then I see that Edward needs must down.
Yet, Warwick, in despite of all mischance,
Of thee thyself and all thy complices,
Edward will always bear himself as king:
Though fortune's malice overthrow my state,
My mind exceeds the compass of her wheel.
WARWICK Then, for his mind, be Edward England's king:
  [Takes off his crown]
  But Henry now shall wear the English crown,
And be true king indeed, thou but the shadow.
My Lord of Somerset, at my request,
See that forthwith Duke Edward be convey'd
Unto my brother, Archbishop of York.
When I have fought with Pembroke and his fellows,
I'll follow you, and tell what answer
Lewis and the Lady Bona send to him.
Now, for a while farewell, good Duke of York.
  [They lead him out forcibly]
KING EDWARD IV What fates impose, that men must needs abide;
It boots not to resist both wind and tide.
  [Exit, guarded]
OXFORD What now remains, my lords, for us to do
But march to London with our soldiers?
WARWICK Ay, that's the first thing that we have to do;
To free King Henry from imprisonment
And see him seated in the regal throne.
  [Exeunt]

 

To see other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act III, Scene 3 France. KING LEWIS XI's palace.
Act I, Scene 1 London. The Parliament-house. Act IV, Scene 1 London. The palace.
Act I, Scene 2 Sandal Castle. Act IV, Scene 2 A plain in Warwickshire./Act IV, Scene 3 Edward's camp, near Warwick.
Act I, Scene 3 Field of battle betwixt Sandal Castle and Wakefield. Act IV, Scene 4 London. The palace./Act IV, Scene 5 A park near Middleham Castle In Yorkshire.
Act I, Scene 4 Another part of the field. Act IV, Scene 6 London. The Tower.
Act II, Scene 1 A plain near Mortimer's Cross in Herefordshire. Act IV, Scene 7 Before York./Act IV, Scene 8 London. The palace.
Act II, Scene 2 Before York. Act V, Scene 1 Coventry.
Act II, Scene 3 A field of battle between Towton and Saxton, in Yorkshire. Act V, Scene 2 A field of battle near Barnet. /Act V, Scene 3 Another part of the field.
Act II, Scene 4 Another part of the field./Act II, Scene 5 Another part of the field. Act V, Scene 4 Plains near Tewksbury.
Act II, Scene 6 Another part of the field. Act V, Scene 5 Another part of the field.
Act III, Scene 1 A forest in the north of England. Act V, Scene 6 London. The Tower.
Act III, Scene 2 London. The palace. Act V, Scene 7 London. The palace.

 

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Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John
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The Merry Wives of Windsor A Mid Summer Night's Dream  Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II
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Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsman The Winter's Tale

 

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