Act IV, Scene 4 London. The palace.

Enter QUEEN ELIZABETH and RIVERS

 

RIVERS Madam, what makes you in this sudden change?
QUEEN ELIZABETH Why brother Rivers, are you yet to learn
What late misfortune is befall'n King Edward?
RIVERS What! loss of some pitch'd battle against Warwick?
QUEEN ELIZABETH No, but the loss of his own royal person.
RIVERS Then is my sovereign slain?
QUEEN ELIZABETH Ay, almost slain, for he is taken prisoner,
Either betray'd by falsehood of his guard
Or by his foe surprised at unawares:
And, as I further have to understand,
Is new committed to the Bishop of York,
Fell Warwick's brother and by that our foe.
RIVERS These news I must confess are full of grief;
Yet, gracious madam, bear it as you may:
Warwick may lose, that now hath won the day.
QUEEN ELIZABETH Till then fair hope must hinder life's decay.
And I the rather wean me from despair
For love of Edward's offspring in my womb:
This is it that makes me bridle passion
And bear with mildness my misfortune's cross;
Ay, ay, for this I draw in many a tear
And stop the rising of blood-sucking sighs,
Lest with my sighs or tears I blast or drown
King Edward's fruit, true heir to the English crown.
RIVERS But, madam, where is Warwick then become?
QUEEN ELIZABETH I am inform'd that he comes towards London,
To set the crown once more on Henry's head:
Guess thou the rest; King Edward's friends must down,
But, to prevent the tyrant's violence,--
For trust not him that hath once broken faith,--
I'll hence forthwith unto the sanctuary,
To save at least the heir of Edward's right:
There shall I rest secure from force and fraud.
Come, therefore, let us fly while we may fly:
If Warwick take us we are sure to die.
  [Exeunt]

 

Act IV, Scene 5 A park near Middleham Castle In Yorkshire.

Enter GLOUCESTER, HASTINGS, and STANLEY

 

GLOUCESTER Now, my Lord Hastings and Sir William Stanley,
Leave off to wonder why I drew you hither,
Into this chiefest thicket of the park.
Thus stands the case: you know our king, my brother,
Is prisoner to the bishop here, at whose hands
He hath good usage and great liberty,
And, often but attended with weak guard,
Comes hunting this way to disport himself.
I have advertised him by secret means
That if about this hour he make his way
Under the colour of his usual game,
He shall here find his friends with horse and men
To set him free from his captivity.
  [Enter KING EDWARD IV and a Huntsman with him]
Huntsman This way, my lord; for this way lies the game.
KING EDWARD IV Nay, this way, man: see where the huntsmen stand.
Now, brother of Gloucester, Lord Hastings, and the rest,
Stand you thus close, to steal the bishop's deer?
GLOUCESTER Brother, the time and case requireth haste:
Your horse stands ready at the park-corner.
KING EDWARD IV But whither shall we then?
HASTINGS To Lynn, my lord,
And ship from thence to Flanders.
GLOUCESTER Well guess'd, believe me; for that was my meaning.
KING EDWARD IV Stanley, I will requite thy forwardness.
GLOUCESTER But wherefore stay we? 'tis no time to talk.
KING EDWARD IV Huntsman, what say'st thou? wilt thou go along?
Huntsman Better do so than tarry and be hang'd.
GLOUCESTER Come then, away; let's ha' no more ado.
KING EDWARD IV Bishop, farewell: shield thee from Warwick's frown;
And pray that I may repossess the crown.
  [Exeunt]

 

To see other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act III, Scene 3 France. KING LEWIS XI's palace.
Act I, Scene 1 London. The Parliament-house. Act IV, Scene 1 London. The palace.
Act I, Scene 2 Sandal Castle. Act IV, Scene 2 A plain in Warwickshire./Act IV, Scene 3 Edward's camp, near Warwick.
Act I, Scene 3 Field of battle betwixt Sandal Castle and Wakefield. Act IV, Scene 4 London. The palace./Act IV, Scene 5 A park near Middleham Castle In Yorkshire.
Act I, Scene 4 Another part of the field. Act IV, Scene 6 London. The Tower.
Act II, Scene 1 A plain near Mortimer's Cross in Herefordshire. Act IV, Scene 7 Before York./Act IV, Scene 8 London. The palace.
Act II, Scene 2 Before York. Act V, Scene 1 Coventry.
Act II, Scene 3 A field of battle between Towton and Saxton, in Yorkshire. Act V, Scene 2 A field of battle near Barnet. /Act V, Scene 3 Another part of the field.
Act II, Scene 4 Another part of the field./Act II, Scene 5 Another part of the field. Act V, Scene 4 Plains near Tewksbury.
Act II, Scene 6 Another part of the field. Act V, Scene 5 Another part of the field.
Act III, Scene 1 A forest in the north of England. Act V, Scene 6 London. The Tower.
Act III, Scene 2 London. The palace. Act V, Scene 7 London. The palace.

 

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Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John
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The Merry Wives of Windsor A Mid Summer Night's Dream  Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II
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Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsman The Winter's Tale

 

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