Act V, Scene 6 The French camp.

Enter LEWIS and his train

 

LEWIS The sun of heaven methought was loath to set,
But stay'd and made the western welkin blush,
When English measure backward their own ground
In faint retire. O, bravely came we off,
When with a volley of our needless shot,
After such bloody toil, we bid good night;
And wound our tattering colours clearly up,
Last in the field, and almost lords of it!
  [Enter a Messenger]
Messenger Where is my prince, the Dauphin?
LEWIS Here: what news?
Messenger The Count Melun is slain; the English lords
By his persuasion are again fall'n off,
And your supply, which you have wish'd so long,
Are cast away and sunk on Goodwin Sands.
LEWIS Ah, foul shrewd news! beshrew thy very heart!
I did not think to be so sad to-night
As this hath made me. Who was he that said
King John did fly an hour or two before
The stumbling night did part our weary powers?
Messenger Whoever spoke it, it is true, my lord.
LEWIS Well; keep good quarter and good care to-night:
The day shall not be up so soon as I,
To try the fair adventure of to-morrow.
  [Exeunt]

 

Act V, Scene 6 An open place in the neighbourhood of Swinstead Abbey.

Enter the BASTARD and HUBERT, severally

 

HUBERT Who's there? speak, ho! speak quickly, or I shoot.
BASTARD A friend. What art thou?
HUBERT Of the part of England.
BASTARD Whither dost thou go?
HUBERT What's that to thee? why may not I demand
Of thine affairs, as well as thou of mine?
BASTARD Hubert, I think?
HUBERT Thou hast a perfect thought:
I will upon all hazards well believe
Thou art my friend, that know'st my tongue so well.
Who art thou?
BASTARD Who thou wilt: and if thou please,
Thou mayst befriend me so much as to think
I come one way of the Plantagenets.
HUBERT Unkind remembrance! thou and eyeless night
Have done me shame: brave soldier, pardon me,
That any accent breaking from thy tongue
Should 'scape the true acquaintance of mine ear.
BASTARD Come, come; sans compliment, what news abroad?
HUBERT Why, here walk I in the black brow of night,
To find you out.
BASTARD Brief, then; and what's the news?
HUBERT O, my sweet sir, news fitting to the night,
Black, fearful, comfortless and horrible.
BASTARD Show me the very wound of this ill news:
I am no woman, I'll not swoon at it.
HUBERT The king, I fear, is poison'd by a monk:
I left him almost speechless; and broke out
To acquaint you with this evil, that you might
The better arm you to the sudden time,
Than if you had at leisure known of this.
BASTARD How did he take it? who did taste to him?
HUBERT A monk, I tell you; a resolved villain,
Whose bowels suddenly burst out: the king
Yet speaks and peradventure may recover.
BASTARD Who didst thou leave to tend his majesty?
HUBERT Why, know you not? the lords are all come back,
And brought Prince Henry in their company;
At whose request the king hath pardon'd them,
And they are all about his majesty.
BASTARD Withhold thine indignation, mighty heaven,
And tempt us not to bear above our power!
I'll tell tree, Hubert, half my power this night,
Passing these flats, are taken by the tide;
These Lincoln Washes have devoured them;
Myself, well mounted, hardly have escaped.
Away before: conduct me to the king;
I doubt he will be dead or ere I come.
  [Exeunt]

 

To view other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act IV, Scene 2 KING JOHN'S palace.
Act I, Scene 1 KING JOHN'S palace. Act IV, Scene 3 Before the castle.
Act II, Scene 1 France. Before Angiers. Act V, Scene 1 KING JOHN'S palace.
Act III, Scene 1 The French King's pavilion. Act V, Scene 2 LEWIS's camp at St. Edmundsbury.
Act III, Scene 2 The same. Plains near Angiers./Act III, Scene 3 The same.  Act V, Scene 3 The field of battle./Act V, Scene 4 Another part of the field.
Act III, Scene 4 The same. KING PHILIP'S tent. Act V, Scene 5 The French Camp/Act V, Scene 6 An open place in the neighbourhood of Swinstead Abbey.
Act IV, Scene 1 A room in a castle. Act V, Scene 7 The orchard in Swinstead Abbey.

 

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