Act IV, Scene 2 Athens. QUINCE'S house.

Enter QUINCE, FLUTE, SNOUT, and STARVELING

 

QUINCE Have you sent to Bottom's house? is he come home yet?
STARVELING He cannot be heard of. Out of doubt he is
transported.
FLUTE If he come not, then the play is marred: it goes
not forward, doth it?
QUINCE It is not possible: you have not a man in all
Athens able to discharge Pyramus but he.
FLUTE No, he hath simply the best wit of any handicraft
man in Athens.
QUINCE Yea and the best person too; and he is a very
paramour for a sweet voice.
FLUTE You must say 'paragon:' a paramour is, God bless us,
a thing of naught.
  [Enter SNUG]
SNUG Masters, the duke is coming from the temple, and
there is two or three lords and ladies more married:
if our sport had gone forward, we had all been made
men.
FLUTE O sweet bully Bottom! Thus hath he lost sixpence a
day during his life; he could not have 'scaped
sixpence a day: an the duke had not given him
sixpence a day for playing Pyramus, I'll be hanged;
he would have deserved it: sixpence a day in
Pyramus, or nothing.
  [Enter BOTTOM]
BOTTOM Where are these lads? where are these hearts?
QUINCE Bottom! O most courageous day! O most happy hour!
BOTTOM Masters, I am to discourse wonders: but ask me not
what; for if I tell you, I am no true Athenian. I
will tell you every thing, right as it fell out.
QUINCE Let us hear, sweet Bottom.
BOTTOM Not a word of me. All that I will tell you is, that
the duke hath dined. Get your apparel together,
good strings to your beards, new ribbons to your
pumps; meet presently at the palace; every man look
o'er his part; for the short and the long is, our
play is preferred. In any case, let Thisby have
clean linen; and let not him that plays the lion
pair his nails, for they shall hang out for the
lion's claws. And, most dear actors, eat no onions
nor garlic, for we are to utter sweet breath; and I
do not doubt but to hear them say, it is a sweet
comedy. No more words: away! go, away!
  [Exeunt]

 

To view other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act III, Scene 1 The wood Titania lying asleep.
Act I, Scene 1 Athens The Palace of Theseus. Act III, Scene 2 Another part of the wood
Act I, Scene 2 Athens Quince's House. Act IV, Part 1 The same
Act II, Scene 1 A Wood near Athens. Act IV, Part 2 Quince's House
Act II, Scene 2 Another part of the wood. Act V, Part 1 The Palace of Theseus

 

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