Act I, Scene 5 Corioli. A street.

Enter certain Romans, with spoils

 

First Roman This will I carry to Rome.
Second Roman And I this.
Third Roman A murrain on't! I took this for silver.
  [Alarum continues still afar off]
  [Enter MARCIUS and TITUS LARTIUS with a trumpet]
MARCIUS See here these movers that do prize their hours
At a crack'd drachm! Cushions, leaden spoons,
Irons of a doit, doublets that hangmen would
Bury with those that wore them, these base slaves,
Ere yet the fight be done, pack up: down with them!
And hark, what noise the general makes! To him!
There is the man of my soul's hate, Aufidius,
Piercing our Romans: then, valiant Titus, take
Convenient numbers to make good the city;
Whilst I, with those that have the spirit, will haste
To help Cominius.
LARTIUS Worthy sir, thou bleed'st;
Thy exercise hath been too violent for
A second course of fight.
MARCIUS Sir, praise me not;
My work hath yet not warm'd me: fare you well:
The blood I drop is rather physical
Than dangerous to me: to Aufidius thus
I will appear, and fight.
LARTIUS Now the fair goddess, Fortune,
Fall deep in love with thee; and her great charms
Misguide thy opposers' swords! Bold gentleman,
Prosperity be thy page!
MARCIUS Thy friend no less
Than those she placeth highest! So, farewell.
LARTIUS Thou worthiest Marcius!
  [Exit MARCIUS]
  Go, sound thy trumpet in the market-place;
Call thither all the officers o' the town,
Where they shall know our mind: away!
  [Exeunt]

 

Act I, Scene 6 Near the camp of Cominius.

Enter COMINIUS, as it were in retire,
with soldiers

 

COMINIUS Breathe you, my friends: well fought;
we are come off
Like Romans, neither foolish in our stands,
Nor cowardly in retire: believe me, sirs,
We shall be charged again. Whiles we have struck,
By interims and conveying gusts we have heard
The charges of our friends. Ye Roman gods!
Lead their successes as we wish our own,
That both our powers, with smiling
fronts encountering,
May give you thankful sacrifice.
  [Enter a Messenger]
  Thy news?
Messenger The citizens of Corioli have issued,
And given to Lartius and to Marcius battle:
I saw our party to their trenches driven,
And then I came away.
COMINIUS Though thou speak'st truth,
Methinks thou speak'st not well.
How long is't since?
Messenger Above an hour, my lord.
COMINIUS 'Tis not a mile; briefly we heard their drums:
How couldst thou in a mile confound an hour,
And bring thy news so late?
Messenger Spies of the Volsces
Held me in chase, that I was forced to wheel
Three or four miles about, else had I, sir,
Half an hour since brought my report.
COMINIUS Who's yonder,
That does appear as he were flay'd? O gods
He has the stamp of Marcius; and I have
Before-time seen him thus.
MARCIUS [Within] Come I too late?
COMINIUS The shepherd knows not thunder from a tabour
More than I know the sound of Marcius' tongue
From every meaner man.
  [Enter MARCIUS]
MARCIUS Come I too late?
COMINIUS Ay, if you come not in the blood of others,
But mantled in your own.
MARCIUS O, let me clip ye
In arms as sound as when I woo'd, in heart
As merry as when our nuptial day was done,
And tapers burn'd to bedward!
COMINIUS Flower of warriors,
How is it with Titus Lartius?
MARCIUS As with a man busied about decrees:
Condemning some to death, and some to exile;
Ransoming him, or pitying, threatening the other;
Holding Corioli in the name of Rome,
Even like a fawning greyhound in the leash,
To let him slip at will.
COMINIUS Where is that slave
Which told me they had beat you to your trenches?
Where is he? call him hither.
MARCIUS Let him alone;
He did inform the truth: but for our gentlemen,
The common file--a plague! tribunes for them!--
The mouse ne'er shunn'd the cat as they did budge
From rascals worse than they.
COMINIUS But how prevail'd you?
MARCIUS Will the time serve to tell? I do not think.
Where is the enemy? are you lords o' the field?
If not, why cease you till you are so?
COMINIUS Marcius,
We have at disadvantage fought and did
Retire to win our purpose.
MARCIUS How lies their battle? know you on which side
They have placed their men of trust?
COMINIUS As I guess, Marcius,
Their bands i' the vaward are the Antiates,
Of their best trust; o'er them Aufidius,
Their very heart of hope.
MARCIUS I do beseech you,
By all the battles wherein we have fought,
By the blood we have shed together, by the vows
We have made to endure friends, that you directly
Set me against Aufidius and his Antiates;
And that you not delay the present, but,
Filling the air with swords advanced and darts,
We prove this very hour.
COMINIUS Though I could wish
You were conducted to a gentle bath
And balms applied to, you, yet dare I never
Deny your asking: take your choice of those
That best can aid your action.
MARCIUS Those are they
That most are willing. If any such be here--
As it were sin to doubt--that love this painting
Wherein you see me smear'd; if any fear
Lesser his person than an ill report;
If any think brave death outweighs bad life
And that his country's dearer than himself;
Let him alone, or so many so minded,
Wave thus, to express his disposition,
And follow Marcius.
  [They all shout and wave their swords, take him up in
their arms, and cast up their caps]
  O, me alone! make you a sword of me?
If these shows be not outward, which of you
But is four Volsces? none of you but is
Able to bear against the great Aufidius
A shield as hard as his. A certain number,
Though thanks to all, must I select
from all: the rest
Shall bear the business in some other fight,
As cause will be obey'd. Please you to march;
And four shall quickly draw out my command,
Which men are best inclined.
COMINIUS March on, my fellows:
Make good this ostentation, and you shall
Divide in all with us.
  [Exeunt]

 

To see other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act III, Scene 3 The same. The Forum
Act I, Scene 1 Rome. A street. Act IV, Scene 1 Rome. Before a gate of the city.
Act I, Scene 2 Corioli.  The Senate house. Act IV, Scene 2 The same. A street near the gate.
Act I, Scene 3 A room in Marcius' house. Act IV, Scene 3 A highway between Rome and Antium/Act IV, Scene 4 Antium. Before Aufidius' house.
Act I, Scene 4 Before Corioli. Act IV, Scene 5 The same. A hall in Aufidius's house.
Act I, Scene 5 Corioli. A street./Act I, Scene 6 Near the camp of Cominius. Act IV, Scene 6 Rome. A public place.
Act I, Scene 7The gates of Corioli/Act I, Scene 8 A field of battle. Act IV, Scene 7 A camp, at a small distance from Rome.
Act I, Scene 9 The Roman camp. /Act I, Scene 10 The camp of the Volsces. Act V, Scene 1 Rome. A public place.
Act II, Scene 1 Rome. A public place. Act V, Scene 2 Entrance of the Volscian camp before Rome.  Two Sentinels on guard.
Act II, Scene 2 The same. The Capitol. Act V, Scene 3 The tent of Coriolanus.
Act II, Scene 3 The same. The Forum. Act V, Scene 4 Rome. A public place, /Act V, Scene 5 The Same. A street near the gate.
Act III, Scene 1 Rome. A street. Act V, Scene 6 A public place.
Act III, Scene 2 A room in Coriolanus' house.  

 

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All's Well the Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Cardenio Comedy of Errors Coriolanus
Cymbeline Edward III Hamlet Henry IV, Part 1 Henry IV, Part 2 Henry V
Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John
King Lear Love's Labours Lost Love's Labours Wonne Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice
The Merry Wives of Windsor A Mid Summer Night's Dream  Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II
Richard III Romeo & Juliet Sir Thomas More Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsman The Winter's Tale

 

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