Act V, Scene 4 Country near Birnam wood.

Drum and colours. Enter MALCOLM, SIWARD and YOUNG SIWARD, MACDUFF, MENTEITH, CAITHNESS, ANGUS, LENNOX, ROSS, and Soldiers, marching

 

MALCOLM Cousins, I hope the days are near at hand
That chambers will be safe.
MENTEITH We doubt it nothing.
SIWARD What wood is this before us?
MENTEITH The wood of Birnam.
MALCOLM Let every soldier hew him down a bough
And bear't before him: thereby shall we shadow
The numbers of our host and make discovery
Err in report of us.
Soldiers It shall be done.
SIWARD We learn no other but the confident tyrant
Keeps still in Dunsinane, and will endure
Our setting down before 't.
MALCOLM 'Tis his main hope:
For where there is advantage to be given,
Both more and less have given him the revolt,
And none serve with him but constrained things
Whose hearts are absent too.
MACDUFF Let our just censures
Attend the true event, and put we on
Industrious soldiership.
SIWARD The time approaches
That will with due decision make us know
What we shall say we have and what we owe.
Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
But certain issue strokes must arbitrate:
Towards which advance the war.
  [Exeunt, marching]

 

Act V, Scene 5 Dunsinane. Within the castle.

Enter MACBETH, SEYTON, and Soldiers, with drum
and colours

 

MACBETH Hang out our banners on the outward walls;
The cry is still 'They come:' our castle's strength
Will laugh a siege to scorn: here let them lie
Till famine and the ague eat them up:
Were they not forced with those that should be ours,
We might have met them dareful, beard to beard,
And beat them backward home.
  [A cry of women within]
  What is that noise?
SEYTON It is the cry of women, my good lord.
  [Exit]
MACBETH I have almost forgot the taste of fears;
The time has been, my senses would have cool'd
To hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair
Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
As life were in't: I have supp'd full with horrors;
Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
Cannot once start me.
  [Re-enter SEYTON]
  Wherefore was that cry?
SEYTON The queen, my lord, is dead.
MACBETH She should have died hereafter;
There would have been a time for such a word.
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
  [Enter a Messenger]
  Thou comest to use thy tongue; thy story quickly.
Messenger Gracious my lord,
I should report that which I say I saw,
But know not how to do it.
MACBETH Well, say, sir.
Messenger As I did stand my watch upon the hill,
I look'd toward Birnam, and anon, methought,
The wood began to move.
MACBETH Liar and slave!
Messenger Let me endure your wrath, if't be not so:
Within this three mile may you see it coming;
I say, a moving grove.
MACBETH If thou speak'st false,
Upon the next tree shalt thou hang alive,
Till famine cling thee: if thy speech be sooth,
I care not if thou dost for me as much.
I pull in resolution, and begin
To doubt the equivocation of the fiend
That lies like truth: 'Fear not, till Birnam wood
Do come to Dunsinane:' and now a wood
Comes toward Dunsinane. Arm, arm, and out!
If this which he avouches does appear,
There is nor flying hence nor tarrying here.
I gin to be aweary of the sun,
And wish the estate o' the world were now undone.
Ring the alarum-bell! Blow, wind! come, wrack!
At least we'll die with harness on our back.
  [Exeunt]

 

To see other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act III, Scene 3 A park near the palace./Act III, Scene 4 The same. A hall in the palace.
Act I, Scene 1 A desert place./Act I, Scene 2 A camp near Forres. Act III, Scene 5 A heath./Act III, Scene 6 Forres. The palace.
Act I, Scene 3 A heath near Forres. Act IV, Scene 1 A cavern in the middle a boiling cauldron
Act I, Scene 4 Forres. The palace. Act IV, Scene 2 Fife. Macduff's castle.
Act I, Scene 5 Inverness Macbeth's castle. Act IV, Scene 3 England, Before the King's palace.
Act I, Scene 6 Before Macbeth's castle. /Act I, Scene 7 Macbeth's castle. Act V, Scene 1 Dunsinane. Anteroom in the castle.
Act II, Scene 1 Court of Macbeth's castle./Act II, Scene 2 The same. Act V, Scene 2 The country near Dunsinane/Act V, Scene 3 Dunsinane. A room in the castle.
Act II, Scene 3 The same. Act V, Scene 4Country near Birnam wood./Act V, Scene 5 Dunsinane. Within the castle.
Act II, Scene 4 Outside Macbeth's castle. Act V, Scene 6 Dunsinane.  Before the castle./Act V, Scene 7 Another part of the field. 
Act III, Scene 1 Forres. The castle. Act V, Scene 8 Another part of the field.
Act III, Scene 2 The palace.  

 

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