Act V, Scene 4 & 5

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Act V, Scene 4 Plains between Troy and the Grecian camp.

Alarums: excursions. Enter THERSITES

 

THERSITES Now they are clapper-clawing one another; I'll go
look on. That dissembling abominable varlets Diomed,
has got that same scurvy doting foolish young knave's
sleeve of Troy there in his helm: I would fain see
them meet; that that same young Trojan ass, that
loves the whore there, might send that Greekish
whore-masterly villain, with the sleeve, back to the
dissembling luxurious drab, of a sleeveless errand.
O' the t'other side, the policy of those crafty
swearing rascals, that stale old mouse-eaten dry
cheese, Nestor, and that same dog-fox, Ulysses, is
not proved worthy a blackberry: they set me up, in
policy, that mongrel cur, Ajax, against that dog of
as bad a kind, Achilles: and now is the cur Ajax
prouder than the cur Achilles, and will not arm
to-day; whereupon the Grecians begin to proclaim
barbarism, and policy grows into an ill opinion.
Soft! here comes sleeve, and t'other.
  [Enter DIOMEDES, TROILUS following]
TROILUS Fly not; for shouldst thou take the river Styx,
I would swim after.
DIOMEDES Thou dost miscall retire:
I do not fly, but advantageous care
Withdrew me from the odds of multitude:
Have at thee!
THERSITES Hold thy whore, Grecian!--now for thy whore,
Trojan!--now the sleeve, now the sleeve!
  [Exeunt TROILUS and DIOMEDES, fighting]
  [Enter HECTOR]
HECTOR What art thou, Greek? art thou for Hector's match?
Art thou of blood and honour?
THERSITES No, no, I am a rascal; a scurvy railing knave:
a very filthy rogue.
HECTOR I do believe thee: live.
  [Exit]
THERSITES God-a-mercy, that thou wilt believe me; but a
plague break thy neck for frightening me! What's
become of the wenching rogues? I think they have
swallowed one another: I would laugh at that
miracle: yet, in a sort, lechery eats itself.
I'll seek them.
  [Exit]

 

Act V, Scene 5 Another part of the plains.

Enter DIOMEDES and a Servant

 

DIOMEDES Go, go, my servant, take thou Troilus' horse;
Present the fair steed to my lady Cressid:
Fellow, commend my service to her beauty;
Tell her I have chastised the amorous Trojan,
And am her knight by proof.
Servant I go, my lord.
  [Exit]
  [Enter AGAMEMNON]
AGAMEMNON Renew, renew! The fierce Polydamas
Hath beat down Menon: bastard Margarelon
Hath Doreus prisoner,
And stands colossus-wise, waving his beam,
Upon the pashed corses of the kings
Epistrophus and Cedius: Polyxenes is slain,
Amphimachus and Thoas deadly hurt,
Patroclus ta'en or slain, and Palamedes
Sore hurt and bruised: the dreadful Sagittary
Appals our numbers: haste we, Diomed,
To reinforcement, or we perish all.
  [Enter NESTOR]
NESTOR Go, bear Patroclus' body to Achilles;
And bid the snail-paced Ajax arm for shame.
There is a thousand Hectors in the field:
Now here he fights on Galathe his horse,
And there lacks work; anon he's there afoot,
And there they fly or die, like scaled sculls
Before the belching whale; then is he yonder,
And there the strawy Greeks, ripe for his edge,
Fall down before him, like the mower's swath:
Here, there, and every where, he leaves and takes,
Dexterity so obeying appetite
That what he will he does, and does so much
That proof is call'd impossibility.
  [Enter ULYSSES]
ULYSSES O, courage, courage, princes! great Achilles
Is arming, weeping, cursing, vowing vengeance:
Patroclus' wounds have roused his drowsy blood,
Together with his mangled Myrmidons,
That noseless, handless, hack'd and chipp'd, come to him,
Crying on Hector. Ajax hath lost a friend
And foams at mouth, and he is arm'd and at it,
Roaring for Troilus, who hath done to-day
Mad and fantastic execution,
Engaging and redeeming of himself
With such a careless force and forceless care
As if that luck, in very spite of cunning,
Bade him win all.
  [Enter AJAX]
AJAX Troilus! thou coward Troilus!
  [Exit]
DIOMEDES Ay, there, there.
NESTOR So, so, we draw together.
  [Enter ACHILLES]
ACHILLES Where is this Hector?
Come, come, thou boy-queller, show thy face;
Know what it is to meet Achilles angry:
Hector? where's Hector? I will none but Hector.
  [Exeunt]

 

To see other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act IV, Scene 1 A street.
Act I, Scene 1 Troy. Before Priam's palace. Act IV, Scene 2 Court of Pandarus' house
Act I, Scene 2 The same. A street. Act IV, Scene 3 Street before Pandarus' house./Act IV, Scene 4 Pandarus' house.
Act I, Scene 3 The Grecian Camp. Before Agamemnon's tent. Act IV, Scene 5 The Grecian camp.
Act II, Scene 1 A part of the Grecian camp. Act V, Scene 1 Before Achilles' tent.
Act II, Scene 2 A room in Priam's palace. Act V, Scene 2 Before Calchas' tent.
Act II, Scene 3 Before Achilles' tent. Act V, Scene 3 Before Priam's tent.
Act III, Scene 1 Priam's palace Act V, Scene 4 Plains between Troy and the Grecian camp./Act V, Scene 5 Another part of the plains.
Act III, Scene 2 Pandarus' orchard. Act V, Scene 6 Another part of the plains./Act V, Scene 7 Another part of the plains./Act V, Scene 8 Another part of the plains.
Act III, Scene 3 Before Achilles' tent. Act V, Scene 9 Another part of the plains./Act V, Scene 10 Another part of the plains.

 

To view other Troilus and Cressida sections:

Main Play Page     Play Text     Scene by Scene Synopsis      Character Directory     Commentary  

 

To view the other Plays click below:

By  Comedies    Histories    Romances    Tragedies

All's Well the Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Cardenio Comedy of Errors Coriolanus
Cymbeline Edward III Hamlet Henry IV, Part 1 Henry IV, Part 2 Henry V
Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John
King Lear Love's Labours Lost Love's Labours Wonne Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice
The Merry Wives of Windsor A Mid Summer Night's Dream  Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II
Richard III Romeo & Juliet Sir Thomas More Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsman The Winter's Tale

 

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