Act V. Scene 6-8

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Act V, Scene 6 Another part of the plains.

Enter AJAX

 

AJAX Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!
  [Enter DIOMEDES]
DIOMEDES Troilus, I say! where's Troilus?
AJAX What wouldst thou?
DIOMEDES I would correct him.
AJAX Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
Ere that correction. Troilus, I say! what, Troilus!
  [Enter TROILUS]
TROILUS O traitor Diomed! turn thy false face, thou traitor,
And pay thy life thou owest me for my horse!
DIOMEDES Ha, art thou there?
AJAX I'll fight with him alone: stand, Diomed.
DIOMEDES He is my prize; I will not look upon.
TROILUS Come, both you cogging Greeks; have at you both!
  [Exeunt, fighting]
  [Enter HECTOR]
HECTOR Yea, Troilus? O, well fought, my youngest brother!
  [Enter ACHILLES]
ACHILLES Now do I see thee, ha! have at thee, Hector!
HECTOR Pause, if thou wilt.
ACHILLES I do disdain thy courtesy, proud Trojan:
Be happy that my arms are out of use:
My rest and negligence befriends thee now,
But thou anon shalt hear of me again;
Till when, go seek thy fortune.
  [Exit]
HECTOR Fare thee well:
I would have been much more a fresher man,
Had I expected thee. How now, my brother!
  [Re-enter TROILUS]
TROILUS Ajax hath ta'en AEneas: shall it be?
No, by the flame of yonder glorious heaven,
He shall not carry him: I'll be ta'en too,
Or bring him off: fate, hear me what I say!
I reck not though I end my life to-day.
  [Exit]
  [Enter one in sumptuous armour]
HECTOR Stand, stand, thou Greek; thou art a goodly mark:
No? wilt thou not? I like thy armour well;
I'll frush it and unlock the rivets all,
But I'll be master of it: wilt thou not,
beast, abide?
Why, then fly on, I'll hunt thee for thy hide.
  [Exeunt]

 

Act V, Scene 7 Another part of the plains.

Enter ACHILLES, with Myrmidons

 

ACHILLES Come here about me, you my Myrmidons;
Mark what I say. Attend me where I wheel:
Strike not a stroke, but keep yourselves in breath:
And when I have the bloody Hector found,
Empale him with your weapons round about;
In fellest manner execute your aims.
Follow me, sirs, and my proceedings eye:
It is decreed Hector the great must die.
  [Exeunt]
  [Enter MENELAUS and PARIS, fighting:
then THERSITES]
THERSITES The cuckold and the cuckold-maker are at it. Now,
bull! now, dog! 'Loo, Paris, 'loo! now my double-
henned sparrow! 'loo, Paris, 'loo! The bull has the
game: ware horns, ho!
  [Exeunt PARIS and MENELAUS]
  [Enter MARGARELON]
MARGARELON Turn, slave, and fight.
THERSITES What art thou?
MARGARELON A bastard son of Priam's.
THERSITES I am a bastard too; I love bastards: I am a bastard
begot, bastard instructed, bastard in mind, bastard
in valour, in every thing illegitimate. One bear will
not bite another, and wherefore should one bastard?
Take heed, the quarrel's most ominous to us: if the
son of a whore fight for a whore, he tempts judgment:
farewell, bastard.
  [Exit]
MARGARELON The devil take thee, coward!
  [Exit]

 

Act V, Scene 8 Another part of the plains.

Enter HECTOR

 

HECTOR Most putrefied core, so fair without,
Thy goodly armour thus hath cost thy life.
Now is my day's work done; I'll take good breath:
Rest, sword; thou hast thy fill of blood and death.
  [Puts off his helmet and hangs his shield
behind him]
  [Enter ACHILLES and Myrmidons]
ACHILLES Look, Hector, how the sun begins to set;
How ugly night comes breathing at his heels:
Even with the vail and darking of the sun,
To close the day up, Hector's life is done.
HECTOR I am unarm'd; forego this vantage, Greek.
ACHILLES Strike, fellows, strike; this is the man I seek.
  [HECTOR falls]
  So, Ilion, fall thou next! now, Troy, sink down!
Here lies thy heart, thy sinews, and thy bone.
On, Myrmidons, and cry you all amain,
'Achilles hath the mighty Hector slain.'
  [A retreat sounded]
  Hark! a retire upon our Grecian part.
MYRMIDONS The Trojan trumpets sound the like, my lord.
ACHILLES The dragon wing of night o'erspreads the earth,
And, stickler-like, the armies separates.
My half-supp'd sword, that frankly would have fed,
Pleased with this dainty bait, thus goes to bed.
  [Sheathes his sword]
  Come, tie his body to my horse's tail;
Along the field I will the Trojan trail.
  [Exeunt]

 

To see other scenes from the show:

Full Text Act IV, Scene 1 A street.
Act I, Scene 1 Troy. Before Priam's palace. Act IV, Scene 2 Court of Pandarus' house
Act I, Scene 2 The same. A street. Act IV, Scene 3 Street before Pandarus' house./Act IV, Scene 4 Pandarus' house.
Act I, Scene 3 The Grecian Camp. Before Agamemnon's tent. Act IV, Scene 5 The Grecian camp.
Act II, Scene 1 A part of the Grecian camp. Act V, Scene 1 Before Achilles' tent.
Act II, Scene 2 A room in Priam's palace. Act V, Scene 2 Before Calchas' tent.
Act II, Scene 3 Before Achilles' tent. Act V, Scene 3 Before Priam's tent.
Act III, Scene 1 Priam's palace Act V, Scene 4 Plains between Troy and the Grecian camp./Act V, Scene 5 Another part of the plains.
Act III, Scene 2 Pandarus' orchard. Act V, Scene 6 Another part of the plains./Act V, Scene 7 Another part of the plains./Act V, Scene 8 Another part of the plains.
Act III, Scene 3 Before Achilles' tent. Act V, Scene 9 Another part of the plains./Act V, Scene 10 Another part of the plains.

 

To view other Troilus and Cressida sections:

Main Play Page     Play Text     Scene by Scene Synopsis      Character Directory     Commentary  

 

To view the other Plays click below:

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All's Well the Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Cardenio Comedy of Errors Coriolanus
Cymbeline Edward III Hamlet Henry IV, Part 1 Henry IV, Part 2 Henry V
Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John
King Lear Love's Labours Lost Love's Labours Wonne Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice
The Merry Wives of Windsor A Mid Summer Night's Dream  Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Richard II
Richard III Romeo & Juliet Sir Thomas More Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus Troilus & Cressida Twelfth Night Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsman The Winter's Tale

 

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